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07Jun

Ready to Up Your Game? Try These 5 Agile Concepts in Real Life.

 With the popularity and overwhelming success of Agility in both software development and now the business world, people are taking the principles of this management approach and using them in a third way: to make their personal lives more fulfilling. 
 
If you consider yourself a ScrumMaster, or even have ScrumMaster tendencies, it’s time to up your Agile game and apply these five concepts from the Agile office to your personal life. This will help you start to bring flow to the chaos at home, and have a more organized and productive week (or year!).

22May

How to Onboard and Train New Virtual Team Members

Hiring new employees can feel like a risk. And in fact, it is. SHRM research recently showed that half of all hourly workers leave new jobs in the first four months, and half of all senior outside hires fail within 18 months. This places huge import on the interview and onboarding process for a company, especially when a team is distributed.

22May

5 Tips for Overcoming the Language Barrier on a Distributed Team

In a distributed team, diversity can mean a number of things. Removing the barrier of geographic proximity and the need to commute can be a great advantage in getting the best possible people for the job. More and more, we’re seeing businesses take advantage of the flexibility of a distributed office to hire across borders and create an international team.
12Apr

Icebreakers for Distributed Agile Teams

Getting to know new coworkers is relatively easy when you work together in a physical office space. When you spot a new person at the water cooler, you’ll eventually say hello, chat about weekend plans, and become better team members and collaborators as a result. But if you’re working from a home office, it’s easy to keep your head down, get your work done, and fly under the radar without anyone ever noticing you—and that’s not a good thing.

21Mar

Could I Get Tired of Paradise?

I woke up this morning to the sun shining through my window and the sound of the ocean waves crashing at 5AM. I drank coffee with beans that were grown at the base of a Central American volcano. I sat on my porch and watched surfers rise and fall with the sea while I turned on my laptop to start my work day.

25Oct

Encouraging Collaboration in a Distributed Team Environment

They say that leading a team is similar to conducting an orchestra; with a lot of practice and attention, you can get everyone to play the same tune. But what do you do if the orchestra members are not only in different rooms, but on different continents? How do you get your team to perform a symphony when some members are playing while others are asleep? And how can you expect to get everyone on the same page when even something as simple as ensuring a time-sensitive email is read and actioned can pose a logistical challenge?
18Oct

10 Tips for Encouraging Casual Communication in a Remote Team Environment

Casual communication at work happens continually, and is often responsible for generating innovative ideas and initiating smart solutions. In a traditional office environment, where everybody works in the same physical area, such interaction can be anything from a chat in a break room or a couple of minutes before a meeting starts, to mapping out a task with colleagues in the kitchen area and pulling two or three people together for an impromptu meeting.
23Sep

The Femgineer Way: Poornima Vijayashankar on Building and Managing Remote Teams, Part 1

Mandy Ross, Director of Community with Sococo sat down with Poornima Vijayashankar, the founding engineer of  Femgineer.com to talk about her path to working remotely and eventually leading an international distributed team.
15Sep

Distributed Teams: How to Assess Level of Team Performance (Part 2)

The second area of assessment is to understand the contribution that the team is making. This is really an effectiveness measure and is focused on the quality of the output of the team, from a customer value perspective. It very much borrows from the key principles of the Agile Manifesto. In very simple terms, it is understanding how much of the outcome can be divided into the “valuable to the customer” bucket and how much ends up in the rework bucket.